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Pumpkin Pancakes with Pumpkin Maple Sauce

I give you two different recipes for pumpkin pancakes here to experiment with and a recipe for a warm pumpkin and maple syrup sauce that will make your pumpkin pancake breakfast really special and provide lots of beta-carotene. Have fun topping your pancakes with various fruits. Mandarin oranges and blueberries. Strawberries and bananas. Raspberries and blueberries. Hot Apple Compote. Diced peaches.

I suggest you read my blog for tips on making perfect pancakes and apply those tips to making these recipes. In that blog I also link to an electric griddle that I recommend cooking all your pancakes on since you can control the temperature which is key to making perfect pancakes.

With its bright orange color, the pumpkin is bursting with beta-carotene, vitamin C and also potassium. Current research shows that the anti-oxidant beta-carotene may reduce the risks of developing certain types of cancer and may offer protection against heart disease.  Pumpkin seeds & pumpkin seed oil are good sources of zinc and unsaturated fatty acids.

Botanically speaking, a pumpkin is a squash and is native to the Americas dating as far back as the Indians in the 1500’s.  Pumpkins have become a symbol of American tradition at both Halloween & Thanksgiving thanks to the first colonial settlers.  Pumpkins can be served as a boiled or baked vegetable and a filling for pies, custards or cornbread.   Pumpkin seeds can be roasted for healthy snacking!

Pumpkin Nutrition Facts
(1 cup cooked, boiled, drained, without salt)

Calories 49
Protein 2 grams
Carbohydrate 12 grams
Dietary Fiber 3 grams
Calcium 37 mg
Iron 1.4 mg
Magnesium 22 mg
Potassium 564 mg
Zinc 1 mg
Selenium .50 mg
Vitamin C 12 mg
Niacin 1 mg
Folate 21 mcg
Vitamin A 2650 IU
Vitamin E 3 mg

Pumpkin Maple Sauce

Top your favorite pancakes with Pumpkin Maple Sauce. It is wonderful and has lots of beta-carotene.

Heat 1 cup maple syrup, 1 1/4 cups LIBBY’S 100% Pure Pumpkin and 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice in small saucepan until warm.

SPICED PUMPKIN PANCAKES

The perfect breakfast for a cool Fall Sunday morning.

1 1/4 cups all purpose flour
3 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 1/4 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/3 cups milk
3/4 cup canned pure pumpkin
4 large eggs, separated, discard 2 yolks
3 Tbs unsalted butter, melted
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Canola oil
Maple syrup

Whisk first 5 ingredients in large bowl to blend. Whisk milk, pumpkin, 2 egg yolks, melted butter and vanilla in medium bowl to blend well. Add pumpkin mixture to dry ingredients; whisk just until smooth (batter will be thick). Using an electric mixer beat egg whites in another medium bowl until stiff but not dry. Fold whites into batter in 2 additions. Brush large nonstick skillet or griddle lightly with oil; heat over medium heat. Working in batches, pour batter by 1/3 cupfuls into skillet. Cook until bubbles form on surface of pancakes and bottoms are brown, about 1 1/2 minutes per side. Repeat with remaining batter, brushing skillet lightly with oil between batches. Serve with syrup. Makes about 12

Spiced Pumpkin Pancakes Bon Appétit | November 2000  

Yield: Makes about 12

1 1/4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
3 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 1/4 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/3 cups whole milk
3/4 cup canned pure pumpkin
4 large eggs, separated
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, melted
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Whisk first 5 ingredients in large bowl to blend. Whisk milk, pumpkin, egg yolks, melted butter and vanilla in medium bowl to blend well. Add pumpkin mixture to dry ingredients; whisk just until smooth (batter will be thick). Using electric mixer, beat egg whites in another medium bowl until stiff but not dry. Fold whites into batter in 2 additions. Brush large nonstick skillet with oil; heat over medium heat. Working in batches, pour batter by 1/3 cupfuls into skillet. Cook until bubbles form on surface of pancakes and bottoms are brown, about 1 1/2 minutes per side. Repeat with remaining batter, brushing skillet with oil between batches. Serve with syrup

 

 

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Sweet Chili Sauce Brussels Sprouts

These are so delicious that I have personally eaten 4 pounds of these in one week! A little sweet, a little spicy, these are addictive! Add a little squirt of Sriracha to the sauce to add more heat if you’d like. 

Ingredients:

2 pounds brussels sprouts, stem trimmed (not too deeply or the leaves will fall off) and halved
3 tablespoons olive or canola oil
3 garlic cloves, finely minced
1 Tbls fish sauce or soy sauce
¼ cup sweet chili sauce

Directions:

Heat the oven to 400 F. Line a baking sheet with foil.

As you stem and halve the Brussels sprouts, toss them into a medium sized bowl. Add the oil and toss the Brussels sprouts to coat evenly. Pour them onto a baking sheet lined with foil. In the same bowl, whisk together the garlic, fish or soy sauce and the sweet chili sauce and set aside.

When the oven is hot, put the baking sheet into the oven and roast in the oven for 15 minutes, tossing them halfway so they cook evenly. Remove Brussels sprouts from the oven and turn oven broiler onto high, with the oven rack positioned in the top third of the oven.

Place the Brussels sprouts into the bowl with the sauce and toss to coat evenly. Put them back onto the baking sheet and broil the Brussels sprouts for 5 minutes or until the chili sauce is bubbling and caramelizing. Watch them carefully so they don’t burn! Remove from the oven and serve immediately.

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Build a Healthy Meal Template

Build your meals around nutrient-rich foods to make Mediterranean style meals focusing on:

Mostly plant foods, lean protein such as seafood or occasionally lean poultry, beans, whole grains, vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, mono fat.

Why? 1. Vegetables, fruits, seafood, lean poultry and whole grains have a low caloric densityCalorie density, also known as calories per pound, is how much energy, i.e. calories, is provided per unit measure of food. Choosing foods with a low calorie density can help with weight loss. 2. These foods are nutrient dense.

Helpful Resource 

This is my favorite book containing a collection of quick to make grain bowls, stews and risottos, that will help you create meals using my build a meal template. The author showcases recipes for vegetarian and vegan meals as well as heartier ones with meat and seafood.

Vegetables    ½ your plate

Salad greens or vegetable salads

Roasted asparagus, cauliflower, broccoli, red pepper strips, mushrooms, etc.

Sautéed or stir fried mixed vegetables, kale, sugar snap peas

Raw vegetables

Broth based vegetable soup

Lean Protein     ¼ of your plate

Shrimp, Salmon, Crab, Fish, Chicken or Turkey Breast, Egg Whites, Tofu and some tofu products, quinoa, Reduced Fat Cottage Cheese, Low Fat Greek Yogurt, Skim Milk

Healthy Carbs    ¼ of your plate

Whole grain products: cereal, bread, tortillas, English muffins, pasta, crackers

Whole grains such as: brown rice, quinoa, barley, farro

Sweet potato or potato

Beans, peas, lentils, corn or green beans

Fruit

Products Spotlight:    *Seeds of Change Quinoa and Brown Rice, precooked and microwavable   *Barilla Whole Grain Pasta    *Trader Joe’s Whole Grain Crispbread      *Trader Joe’s Brown Rice Medley

Healthy Fat  Small Amounts 

Olive oil, olives, olive tapenade, canola oil

Avocado cream (see my blog)

Pesto, Costco’s Kirkland

Avocado

Walnuts or almonds

Nuts and seeds

Light salad dressing

Flavor Boosters  Small amounts of the ones that are calorically dense

Rubs (Spike, El Gaucho, Salish Lodge, Rub with Love), Herbs and Spices, Ceylon Cinnamon, see here more Ceylon Cinnamon info, Turmeric, Salsa, Lemon, Reduced Sodium Soy Sauce, Barbecue Sauce, Sirracha, Chipotles in Adobo, Chili Sauce, mustard, Brummel and Brown Spread, vinegars, Miso, avocado cream (see my blog), Reduced fat sharp cheddar, feta, goat cheese, reduced fat sour cream, dried fruits, Stevia and erythritol. 

Foods to avoid: saturated fat, food colors, red meat, processed meat, deep fried foods, junky gluten-free products, agave (higher in fructose than other sugars), fast food, highly processed food, added sugar, refined grains like white flour, industrial vegetable oils, trans fats, fruit juice, alcohol, barbecued foods, high heat cooked food.

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